Loading configuration via the file system (declarative config)

Some teams require Sourcegraph configuration to be stored in version control as opposed to editing via the Site admin UI.

As of Sourcegraph v3.4+, this is possible for site configuration , code host configuration, and global settings. As of Sourcegraph v3.34+, Sourcegraph supports merging multiple site config files.

Benefits

  1. Configuration can be checked into version control (e.g., Git).
  2. Configuration is enforced across the entire instance, and edits cannot be made via the web UI (by default).
  3. Declarative site-config
  4. Sourcegraph watches the config file for changes and applies any new updates to the corresponding external services.

Drawbacks

Loading configuration in this manner has two significant drawbacks:

  1. You will no longer be able to save configuration edits through the web UI by default (you can use the web UI as scratch space, though).
  2. Sourcegraph sometimes performs automatic migrations of configuration when upgrading versions. This process will now be more manual for you (see below).
  3. Site-config contains sensitive information (see Merging site config for mitigations)

Site configuration

Set SITE_CONFIG_FILE=site.json and mount the config on:

Where site.json is a file that contains the site configuration, which you would otherwise edit through the in-app site configuration editor.

If you want to allow edits to be made through the web UI (which will be overwritten with what is in the file on a subsequent restart), you may additionally set SITE_CONFIG_ALLOW_EDITS=true.

Merging site-configuration

You may separate your site-config into a sensitive and non-sensitive jsonc / json. Set the env var SITE_CONFIG_FILE=/etc/site.json:/other/sensitive-site-config.json. Note the path separator of :

This will merge both files. Sourcegraph will need access both files.

Code host configuration

Set EXTSVC_CONFIG_FILE=extsvc.json and mount the config on:

Where extsvc.json contains a JSON object that specifies all of your code hosts in a single JSONC file:

{
  "GITHUB": [
    {
      // First GitHub code host configuration: literally the JSON object from the code host config editor.
      "authorization": {},
      "url": "https://github.com",
      "token": "...",
      "repositoryQuery": ["affiliated"]
    },
    {
      // Another GitHub code host configuration.
      ...
    },
  ],
  "OTHER": [
    {
      // First "Generic Git host" code host configuration.
      "url": "https://mycodehost.example.com/repos",
      "repos": ["foo"],
    }
  ],
  "PHABRICATOR": [
    {
      // Phabricator code host configuration.
      ...
    },
  ]
}

You can find a full list of valid top-level keys here.

If you want to allow edits to be made through the web UI (which will be overwritten with what is in the file on a subsequent restart), you may additionally set EXTSVC_CONFIG_ALLOW_EDITS=true. Note that if you do enable this, it is your responsibility to ensure the configuration on your instance and in the file remain in sync.

Global settings

Set GLOBAL_SETTINGS_FILE=global-settings.json and mount the config on:

Where global-settings.json contains the global settings, which you would otherwise edit through the in-app global settings editor.

If you want to allow edits to be made through the web UI (which will be overwritten with what is in the file on a subsequent restart), you may additionally set GLOBAL_SETTINGS_ALLOW_EDITS=true. Note that if you do enable this, it is your responsibility to ensure the global settings on your instance and in the file remain in sync.

Upgrades and Migrations

As mentioned earlier, when configuration is loaded via the filesystem, Sourcegraph can no longer persist the automatic migrations to configuration it may perform when upgrading.

It will still perform such migrations on the configuration loaded from file, it just cannot persist such migrations back to file.

When you upgrade Sourcegraph, you should do the following to ensure your configurations do not become invalid:

  1. Upgrade Sourcegraph to the new version
  2. Visit each configuration page in the web UI (management console, site configuration, each code host)
  3. Copy the (now migrated) configuration from those pages into your JSON files.

It is essential to follow the above steps after every Sourcegraph version update, because we only guarantee migrations remain valid across two minor versions. If you fail to apply a migration and later upgrade Sourcegraph twice more, you may effectively “skip” an important migration.

We’re planning to improve this by having Sourcegraph notify you as a site admin when you should do the above, since today it is not actually required in most upgrades. See https://github.com/sourcegraph/sourcegraph/issues/4650 for details. In the meantime, we will do our best to communicate when this is needed to you through the changelog.

Kubernetes ConfigMap

You can load these configuration files via a Kubernetes ConfigMap resource. To do so, create a base/frontend/sourcegraph-frontend.ConfigMap.yaml file with contents like this:

apiVersion: v1
kind: ConfigMap
metadata:
  annotations:
    description: Sourcegraph configuration files
  labels:
    deploy: sourcegraph
  name: frontend-config-files
data:
  # IMPORTANT: see https://docs.sourcegraph.com/admin/config/advanced_config_file for details on how this works.

  # Global user settings, see: https://docs.sourcegraph.com/admin/config/advanced_config_file#global-settings
  global-settings.json: |
    {
        "search.scopes": [
            {
              "name": "Test code",
              "value": "file:(test|spec)"
            },
            {
              "name": "Non-test files",
              "value": "-file:(test|spec)"
            }
        ],
        "extensions": {
          "sourcegraph/git-extras": true,
        }
      }    

  # Site configuration, see: https://docs.sourcegraph.com/admin/config/advanced_config_file#site-configuration
  site.json: |
    {
      "auth.providers": [
        {
          "allowSignup": true,
          "type": "builtin"
        }
      ],
      "externalURL": "https://sourcegraph.example.com",
      "licenseKey": "..."
      }
    }    

  # Code host configuration, see: https://docs.sourcegraph.com/admin/config/advanced_config_file#code-host-configuration
  extsvc.json: |
    {
      "GITHUB": [
        {
          "url": "https://github.com",
          "token": "...",
          "repositoryQuery": [
            "none"
          ],
        }
      ]
    }    

To have Sourcegraph use this new ConfigMap, add the following environment variables to base/frontend/sourcegraph-frontend.Deployment.yaml:

        - name: SITE_CONFIG_FILE
          value: /etc/sourcegraph/site.json
        - name : GLOBAL_SETTINGS_FILE
          value: /etc/sourcegraph/global-settings.json
        - name : EXTSVC_CONFIG_FILE
          value: /etc/sourcegraph/extsvc.json

And instruct Kubernetes to mount the ConfigMap file we created under /etc/sourcegraph/ by adding the following in your sourcegraph-frontend.Deployment.yaml volumeMounts section:

        volumeMounts:
        - mountPath: /etc/sourcegraph
          name: config-volume

And similarly under the volume section:

      - name: config-volume
        configMap:
          name: frontend-config-files
          defaultMode: 0644

Now upon re-running kubectl-apply-all.sh Kubernetes should mount your ConfigMap into the container as files on disk and you should see them:

$ kubectl exec -it sourcegraph-frontend-57dcb4d7db-6bclj -- ls /mnt/
global-settings.json
extsvc.json
site.json

Similarly, because we set the environment variables to use those configuration files, the frontend should have loaded them into the database upon startup. You should now see Sourcegraph configured!

Transitioning to configuration via the file system

Transitioning from a UI based configuration to file system based configuration can be accomplished following the steps above but there are some things to be considered.

Sourcegraph reads from the new extsvc.json file and creates a new entry in the database for any new code host config it finds there. This will not cause a reclone of the repositories synced via the UI based configs. However it is still advised that admins prevent the generation of duplicate code host configurations.

As Sourcegraph reads from an extsvc.json file it reads from the top level schema and creates a new config with display name <codehost type> #<position in json> For example in the extsvc.config below GITHUB #1, GITHUB #2, GITHUB #3, and GITLAB #1 external service configs will be generated.

    {
      "GITHUB": [
        {
          "url": "https://github.com",
          "token": "secret",
          "repos": [
            "latveria/doombot",
            "latveria/darkhold",
            "latveria/timemachine"
          ]
        },
        {
          "url": "https://github.com",
          "token": "secret",
          "orgs": ["sourcegraph"]
        },
        {
          "url": "https://github.com",
          "token": "secret",
          "orgs": [],
          "repos": [
            "grafana/grafana",
            "sourcegraph/deploy-sourcegraph-twit-test",
            "kubernetes/kubernetes",
          ]
        }
      ],
      "GITLAB": [
        {
          "url": "https://gitlab.com",
          "token": "secret",
          "projectQuery": [
            "projects?membership=true&archived=no"
          ]
        }
      ]
    } 

You can avoid generation of a new config by changing the display name of your UI based config to match the relative display name which will be generated by the new extsvc.json file. For Sourcegraph to view a codehost config as already present its display_name, kind, and config must not change. You can take a look at these values in the database by running the following SQL query:

sg=# select id, display_name, kind, config from external_services order by id;

If you encounter any issues, please contact us.